why do you want to go to harvard

If you received an acceptance letter from Harvard a month ago, congratulations! If you have offers from more than one school, even more congratulations! This is a privilege that the vast majority of high school graduates do not have. I have an important piece of advice for the most privileged among youБchoose Harvard. It is the best school. Harvard is the best school because the best students choose Harvard. Year after year, students who are accepted to Harvard and other schools pick Harvard over other schools in the majority of cases. When students are admitted to both Harvard and Yale, for example, 58 percent of students choose
over Yale. The percentage is even more skewed in HarvardБs favor when compared with any other school. Why does this statistic matter, you ask, since these top schools already have top students? This statistic is particularly relevant because Harvard and its main competitors admit top students. Students with more than one offer are doubly validated as top candidates, and are more likely to be the Бcream of the cropБ even among the talented accepted student pool. So even though the top schools generally admit equally talented students, the choice of the Бcream of the cropБ group decides that the right tails of talent at each school may be uneven. Since Harvard beats all other schools in vis-ц -vis comparison, it should have the largest share of cream of the crop students. You will find that you can greatly benefit from having more talented classmates. First, Harvard (together with the aforementioned schools) is a competitive place. The greater your competition, the higher your bar for comparison, and the harder you will strive for success. Despite the competition, you will find it more common to cooperate rather than compete with your classmates, because these classmates will be your debate partners, project teammates, and future co-founders.


You will benefit not just from cooperation or competition, but also from mere interaction with people with different interests and talents. Your classmatesБ innovations and ideas can inspire you to apply them to your own work, through a magical process called. Remember, you applied to the top schools partly because they offer you exposure to motivated and talented classmates. Even among the top schools, there can be differences in talent and motivation, and these differences count. Even if you do not believe you will benefit from having more talented classmates, you should still value their opinions greatly. First, comparison between schools is elusive. It is difficult for any single individual to claim expertise on all aspects of two schools, so there are no true experts in the field. On these elusive questions, dictates that best answers tend to come from aggregation of many peopleБs judgments, rather than the opinion of a single individual. Second, you should expect those who are accepted by more than one schools to form a particularly wise crowd, as they have made good decisions thus far to get accepted by Harvard. Choosing a school mattered as much to them as it does to you, so they must have invested a lot of time comparing schools, as you are doing now. It would be unwise to ignore their preference for Harvard when you deliberate your choice. My advice does not apply to you if you have some unconventional talent and ambition. If you want to be the next NBA starting point guard, you should probably pick University of Kentucky over. If you want to build the next billion-dollar startup, you should probably pick Stanford or UC Berkley over.


Having excelled at these activities, you probably know a lot of people with the same talent and ambition, who faced or are facing the same college decision. In these cases, they are the Бwise crowdБ whom you should trust for their judgment. If you donБt have such a wise crowd to rely on, donБt worry. Others have gathered the data and run the analysis. And they have delivered a verdict:. Jonathan Z. Zhou Б14 is an applied mathematics concentrator in Eliot House. His column appears on alternate Mondays. Legally Blonde has been woven into our collective cultural tapestry. It is littered with epic moments and unforgettable quips. It's also always on TV and impossibly watchable so we're all constantly reminded of how freaking unbelievable this movie is. But. There is always a But. There are some things that just don't make any sense. And theyP bother me guys. So, without further ado, here are some things that still bother me about Legally Blonde. P 1. Why do Warner and Elle attend the same undergraduate institution? The whole crux of the conflict in this film is that after graduation, Warner breaks up with Elle so he can go on to attend Harvard Law School. Meanwhile, Elle is a sorority girl who is focused on fashion and social events. If Warner is truly the intellectual powerhouse he is supposed to be, why is he attending the same undergraduate school as ostensibly ditsy Elle in the first place? It is later revealed that Warner's blue blood legacy helped him end up at Harvard Law, but why is someone as WASP-y as him at some state school in Southern California to begin with? 2. How does Elle enter in the same graduating class with Warner and Vivian? The application time frame is all messed up here.


Warner reveals that he is attending Harvard Law School at the end of the academic year, presumably starting the following fall. Somehow, over the course of a great montage scene, Elle takes the LSATS, puts together her application video, applies to Harvard, and gets accepted all before the start of 1L. When she arrives at Harvard, Elle seems to be a part of Warner and Vivian's graduating class. No questions asked. 3. How is Bruiser In The Dorms? This isn't a huge deal but it is definitely not addressed. I am not sure where you went to college, but when you live in University housing, there is almost always a policy against keeping pets in the dormitory. Elle waltzes into Harvard on the first day-- decks her room out in pink accoutrements and brings her tiny Chihuahua Brewster with her. He lives there throughout her whole career there and the issue is never once broached by the administration. P 4. PWhy wouldn't Brooke Windham just admit to getting liposuction? This is ridiculous. I understand that she has a loyal fanbase from her fitness tapes empire, but she is being accused of. Why would she continue concealing her alibi when she is literally facing a lifetime in prison? It's completely irrational. Perhaps even more absurd is that Elle vows to keep her secret-- despite it being legally and fundamentally unwise. 5. Elle taking the Reins In the final court scene, Elle is allowed to practice law according to a rule in which "senior law students" who have taken a class in evidence can appear as an attorney. At this point in the movie, Elle is just finishing her first year of law school. That in no way makes her "senior" and I don't recall her specifically taking any classes in evidence. But boy is it great when she gets up there, right?

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