why do polar bears live in the north pole

Do Polar Bears Exist in, a spectacular land of ice, framed by rigid waters and home to a plethora of hardy creatures? Read on to find out! So do Polar Bears Exist in Antarctica?? is home to a kaleidoscope of incredibly fascinating creatures, but polar bears are NOTPamong them. Although, given the harsh climate and abundance of icy fields, you could be forgiven for thinking they do. From a wildlife-loving perspective, however, the more interesting question would be: could polar bears live in Antarctica? Lets say, hypothetically speaking, that we were to smuggle a few fluffy polar bears aboard one of our
(now wouldnt make that for a fun adventure?! not that wed ever do that) and set them loose in the White Continent. What would happen? Could they survive? What would the consequences be on and all the other animals, if all of a sudden a brand new apex predator were to be introduced? It may seem like a silly question at first yet you may be surprised to learn its one thats actually been asked seriously in the last few years. As polar bears face an uncertain future due to their diminishing habitat (they are currently listed as endangered) the question of how do we save the polar bears? has given rise to a few suggestions of assisted migration of these majestic animals, from the Arctic to the Antarctic. According to an American zoologist whos nothing short of obsessed with polar bears (hes won several prizes for his extensive conservation work) and is the chief scientist at polar bears would thrive quite well in yet their flourishing would be very short lived. Its interesting to discover that although the and region may appear to be almost identical (lots of ice and snow, and a Pole in the middle! ) their topographical differences have created a plethora of unique habitats and. There are certainly plenty of and on which the polar bears could feed in and, it should be noted, the feasting would be rather abundant. At least for a little while. In a continent where neither nor fears a land predator (whales and leopard seals hunt them only in water) both are blissfully unafraid and very approachable when out of the water.


The fact that you can walk right up to a penguin in is arguably one of the most enticing prospects for all our cruise ship guests (although protocol dictates you wait for them to come up to you). So no matter how alert and speedy they are in the water, they turn to placid, curious creatures when on land. And lets remember that which are normally torpedoes in the water, are comically clumsy when they try to rush on land We couldnt not even imagine a polar bear VS seal battle. That would probably be the shortest combat ever Seals and penguins would indeed make for exceptionally easy prey for the new on-land beasts. So easy, in fact, that Amstrup surmises the long-term effects on the Antarctic environment to be quite catastrophic. Introduce a healthy number of polar bears in, and within just a few years they will have probably gobbled up every seal and penguin within a gazillion mile radius. And then, left with no other food source, the polar bears will also fade into oblivion. Sigh. Join us on a wildlife extravaganza on an expedition cruise ship, and youll enjoy unforgettable up close and personal encounters with some of the most fascinating animals on earth. No polar bears. Promise! Could polar bears live just as well in Antarctica as they do in the north pole? They may well get by, but at least it would supply an answer to the age old question: if a polar bear had a fight with a group of penguins, who'd win? Richard Proctor, London SE13 A polar bear's diet is very varied, and includes seaweed, berries, small mammals and carrion, as well as its principal food source, ringed and bearded seals. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are very closely related to brown bears (Ursus arctos); it could be said they are just brown bears that have adapted to living in polar conditions. They have the same omnivorous, opportunistic approach to feeding. The penguins and seals in the Antarctic have no natural predators to speak of when they are out of the water.


As such, they would be easy meat if polar bears were introduced and could be driven to extinction as a consequence. With the penguins and seals scoffed, the by then enormous polar bear population would in turn crash and it would be highly unlikely that the few remaining bears would be able to find sufficient food to sustain themselves. In other words, any well-intentioned attempt to save polar bears by this means would be an unmitigated disaster. Terence Hollingworth, Blagnac, France Of course polar bears can live in Antarctica! In Biggles' Second Case (1948), Biggles and the boys are in the South Atlantic on the trail of rogue Nazi Captain von Schonbeck and his U-517. While searching for the missing Biggles and Ginger, their pals Algy and Bertie find blood on the ice, while a quarter of a mile away two polar bears are seen swimming away. "I don't think it's much use looking for bodies here", says Algy, leaping to the wrong conclusion as, needless to say, Biggles does win out in the end. However, the fate of the polar bears, or why they were there in the first place, isn't recorded. Oops, Capt WE Johns. Richard Pinder, Seaford, East Sussex Why not? After all, a bear called Paddington emigrated from darkest Peru to the northern hemisphere. Oliver Sheppard, Vincennes, France And anyway, why do we have polar bears in the Arctic and penguins in Antarctica? Glynne Rowlands, Wirral, Merseyside Early peoples such as the Vikings constructed ships that could cross oceans; why did they never attempt any form of aviation, such as sail planes or hang gliders? The ancient Indian religious writings known as the Vedas mention a type of flying machine called a vimana. There is no evidence that such a machine existed, although some writers (notably Erich von Daniken) have cited them as evidence of contact between early humans and extraterrestrials. In a similar vein, it was thought the famous Nazca lines in Peru, which were constructed around 2,000 years ago, must have been created by a people with access to flying machines.


This was because the geoglyphs can only really be appreciated from the air. However, subsequent research has shown they could still have been constructed without any need to monitor the work from a high altitude. Other researchers have claimed the Nazca people could have used hot air balloons in order to supervise the work, which would (theoretically) have been within their capability. Geoff Clifton, Solihull, West Mids The earliest known record of man-powered flight was in Greece. Sadly, the pilot, Icarus, was killed and his father, the designer Daedalus, never attempted further developments в although he is credited with building a maze on Crete for King Midas. Brian Robinson, Brentwood, Essex What phrase did we use for "it's a catch-22 situation" before Joseph Heller wrote the novel? Before "catch-22" caught on in the 1970s, we had a whole range of expressions. We used to say, "it's a double bind," "it's a cleft stick," "it's heads I win, tails you lose," "it's a case of damned if you do, damned if you don't," or "it's a Morton's Fork". The last was a reference to the notorious tax-assessment policy of Henry VII's chancellor, whereby, if a nobleman lived in great style, he was obviously rich, and if he didn't, he was obviously hiding his wealth, and in either case he would be taxed to the hilt. Hugo Barnacle, London NW5 Back in the 70s I met Joseph Heller at a party in New York and asked him what phrase he used before catch-22. He said, rather belligerently, "Catch-18". Sam White, Lewes, East Sussex Any answers? If heaven has angels playing harps, what is hell's official musical instrument? (Will not except bagpipes as an answer). Paul Deighton, Banbury, Oxon Is there anything useful that can be done with the ever increasing number of jellyfish found in our oceans? Eneas Mackintosh, Rome Send questions and answers to nq@theguardian. com. Please include name, address and phone number.

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