why do you get nose bleeds randomly

Sitting in science class one afternoon, you feel your nose begin to run. As you wonder if you're catching a cold, you wipe your nose with a tissue and are shocked to see blood! You have a nosebleed, and if you're like most teens, you may be embarrassed. You might hope no one will notice, and you might be a little scared, too. Although nosebleeds are usually harmless and easily controlled, it may look like a quart of blood is coming from your nose! Try not to worry most nosebleeds are easy to stop. Stopping the Gush Get some tissues or a damp cloth to catch the blood. Sit up or stand. Tilt your head forward and pinch your nostrils together just below the bony center part of your nose. Applying pressure helps stop the blood flow and the nosebleed will usually stop with 10 minutes of steady pressure. Don't stop applying pressure to keep checking if the bleeding has stopped. If you get a nosebleed, don't blow your nose. Doing so can cause additional nosebleeds. Also, don't tilt your head back. This common practice will cause blood to run into your throat. This can make you cough or choke, and if you swallow a lot of blood, you might begin vomiting. If you've tried the steps above twice and the bleeding continues after the second attempt, you'll need to see your school nurse or a doctor. Once you've stopped the initial nosebleed, don't lift heavy objects or do other activities that cause you to strain, and try not to blow your nose for 24 hours.


Now that your nosebleed is over, let's take a look at what a nosebleed is and what can cause it. The most common kind of nosebleed is an anterior nosebleed, which comes from the front of the nose. Capillaries, or very small blood vessels, that are inside the nose may break and bleed, causing this type of nosebleed. Another kind of nosebleed is a posterior nosebleed, which comes from the deepest part of the nose. Blood from a posterior nosebleed flows down the back of the throat even if the person is sitting or standing. Teens rarely have posterior nosebleeds, which occur most often in older people, people who have, and people who have had nose or face injuries. The most common cause of anterior nosebleeds is dry air. A dry climate or heated indoor air irritates and dries out nasal membranes, causing crusts that may itch and then bleed when scratched or picked. may also irritate the lining of the nose. Bleeding may occur after repeated blowing. When you combine a cold with dry winter air, you have the perfect formula for nosebleeds. can also cause problems, and a doctor may prescribe medicine such as antihistamines or decongestants to control an itchy, runny, or stuffy nose. The medicine can also dry out the nasal membranes and contribute to nosebleeds.


An injury to the nose may cause bleeding and isn't usually cause for alarm. If you ever have a facial injury, use the tips outlined earlier to stop the nosebleed. If you can't stop the bleeding after 10 minutes or you are concerned about other facial injuries, see a medical professional right away. Nosebleeds are rarely cause for alarm, but frequent nosebleeds might indicate a more serious problem. If you get nosebleeds more than once a week, you should see your doctor. Most cases of frequent nosebleeds are easily treated. Sometimes tiny blood vessels inside the nose become irritated and don't heal. This happens more frequently in teens who have ongoing allergies or frequent colds. A doctor may have a solution if you have this problem. If your doctor rules out a sinus infection, allergies, or irritated blood vessels, he or she may order other tests to see why you're getting frequent nosebleeds. Rarely, a bleeding disorder or abnormally formed blood vessels could be a possibility. (or other drugs that are snorted through the nose) can also cause nosebleeds. If you suspect a friend is using cocaine, try talking about it and get help from a trusted adult. Whenever you blow your nose (especially when you have a cold), you should blow gently into a soft tissue. Don't blow forcefully or pick your nose. Your doctor may recommend a humidifier to moisten your indoor air.


You can also prevent your nasal passages from becoming too dry in winter months by using lubricants such as an antibiotic ointment before going to bed at night. Apply a pea-sized dab to a cotton swab and gently rub just the cotton tip up inside each nostril, especially on the middle part of the nose (called the nasal septum). Some doctors prescribe saline (salt water) drops or gel for the same purpose. Wear protective athletic equipment when participating in sports that could cause injury to the nose. An occasional nosebleed may make you worry, but there's no need to panic now you know what to do!
SATURDAY, Jan. 31, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nosebleeds are a common during the winter and shouldn't be cause for concern, an expert says. "Cold winter air can be drying and irritating to the nose, and so can forms of indoor heat, such as forced air and fireplaces. Blood flow from the nose can range from a few drops to a real gusher," explained Dr. James Stankiewicz, chair of the otolaryngology department at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill. "Older individuals are more susceptible to nosebleeds in winter because their mucous membranes are not as lush and the dry air causes the thinning blood vessels in the nose to break," he said in a university news release. And older women and people taking blood-thinning drugs have an even greater risk. "Women who are postmenopausal are especially vulnerable to nosebleeds because of the decrease in estrogen that increases bodily fluids.


Anyone who is taking blood thinners such as an aspirin regimen or Coumadin also is prone to nosebleeds," Stankiewicz added. He offered the following advice. If you get a nosebleed, don't panic. "Tilt your head back and apply firm pressure to the nostrils for about five minutes," Stankiewicz said. Apply ice. The cold causes blood vessels to constrict, which limits and slows blood flow. Put petroleum jelly on cotton pads and insert them into your nostrils. "Go to the doctor if the bleeding is profuse and will not stop. The bleeding vessel will likely be cauterized, meaning heat will be applied to the wound to stanch the flow," Stankiewicz said. There are some things you can do to prevent winter nosebleeds, too. "Get a humidifier and run it, especially in the bedrooms, with the door closed, a few hours before bed. You will be spending eight hours or so asleep and your nose, like you, needs a soothing rest," Stankiewicz said. "A dab of petroleum jelly on either side of the septum, two times per day, will aid moisture. Saline sprays and specialized gels and ointments also are readily available at stores," he said. More information The U. S. National Library of Medicine has more about.

  • Views: 170

why do we get nose bleeds for no reason
why do we get a runny nose when we cry
why do my sinuses swell at night
why is there water coming out of my nose
why when i blow my nose it bleeds
why do you have to blow your nose after crying
why do we have high blood pressure