why does my hibiscus plant have yellow leaves

(Author of yellow leaves are common and usually not anything to worry about. Often, hibiscus leaves turning yellow will correct itself. In some cases, pruning of the entire plant is necessary. What Causes Hibiscus Leaves Turning Yellow? The hibiscus leaf turns yellow as a way of signaling a specific need. Many factors contribute to hibiscus leaf yellowing. Becoming familiar with these factors allows you to fix the underlying issue before it becomes a problem. If your hibiscus is suffering from a nutrient deficiency, the leaves will turn partially yellow but remain on the plant. This can be easily corrected by adding fertilizer or amending the soil. Too much water or not enough can result in hibiscus leaves turning yellow. While hibiscus plants require lots of water, especially during periods of excessive heat or windy conditions, overwatering can be detrimental. Ideally, you should water just enough to keep the soil moist, not soggy. Watering should be backed off during dormancy. Wet the soil just enough to prevent it from drying out completely. Inadequate drainage can also affect the hibiscus and yellow leaves often result. Make sure containers provide suitable drainage. Failing to give hibiscus plants enough water can also cause the hibiscus leaf to yellow. Check the soil with your finger to ensure the plant is getting enough water. Self-watering pots are also a good way to alleviate these problems. When temperatures are extremely hot, especially in summer, the hibiscus requires additional watering. Otherwise, the plant will dry up quickly and succumb to heat stress. This can result in the hibiscus leaf turning yellow and eventually dropping off. Likewise, when temperatures get too cold, the hibiscus will also respond with yellowing of its leaves. Ensure that the plant is kept away from drafty locations and excessive wind. Also, be sure to bring the plant indoors when outside temperatures reach freezing. Light is another factor associated with the hibiscus and yellow leaves.


Again, too much sunlight can result in hibiscus leaves turning yellow as well as the development of white spots, which signal plant burn. Remove the damaged leaves and change the location of the plant. If the hibiscus is not getting enough light, the plant may also react with yellow leaves, which will begin dropping in order to make up for the lack of light. This can be easily remedied by moving the plant to an area receiving more sunlight. Yellow leaves can also be an indication that the hibiscus is ready to go dormant. Allow the plant to die down by reducing watering. After allowing the plant to enter dormancy, bring it indoors and keep it in a cool, dark place for a couple months, then cut the hibiscus back and place it in a sunny window. Resume regular watering. When the hibiscus shows new growth, give it a boost of fertilizer. Once spring returns, the plant can be moved outdoors. If your hibiscus has yellow leaves, has stopped blooming, or looks wilted after moving it, the plant may be suffering from stress. This is a common occurrence and can be expected when moved to a different environment. In addition to yellowing, the hibiscus leaf may become mottled with markings on the underside. This can be the result of pests such as. If left untreated, the stressed plant will eventually lose all of its foliage. If you suspect these pests, spray the plant with soapy water or an appropriate form of pesticide. However, take care not to overuse pesticide, as this may also contribute to hibiscus yellow leaves.
Why are the leaves on my tropical hibiscus turning yellow? If your tropical hibiscus has a few yellow leaves here and there, it s nothing to worry about, as the plants regularly renew their leaves by yellowing and dropping the old ones. However, if most of the leaves are yellow, or the plant looks wilted or stunted, it s a sign that something s not right. Tropical hibiscus plants are very vulnerable to environmental changes.


Bringing them indoors or out, repotting, and changes in their care can cause the plant to become stressed. Even minor changes that you might not notice can cause problems. Sometimes yellowing of hibiscus leaves is a sign of temporary distress, and the plant will recover. At other times, it can be a sign of a more serious problem that must be addressed to save the plant. Unfortunately, figuring out the cause of the yellowing leaves requires a bit of detective work, because it can come from lots of different causes. Here are some things to check on your hibiscus: Water: Too much or too little water is a primary cause of yellowing hibiscus leaves. Tropical hibiscus need lots of water, but they don t like to be soggy. Water more often (even daily) during heat waves, and less when it s cool or overcast. Make sure the plant doesn t sit in water and that the soil isn t constantly wet. Soil: Soil compaction, poor drainage, or lack of soil (becoming rootbound) are other causes of leaf yellowing in hibiscus, often because they contribute to water issues. Check the soil pH, and keep it slightly on the acidic side. Gently probe the soil around your plant, or lift it out of the pot, to see if the roots are packed and circling. If your hibiscus needs repotting, use a light, well-draining potting mix or soilless medium. Don t plant in too big a pot, as hibiscus like to be just a wee bit crowded. Temperature Changes: Moving your hibiscus, bringing it indoors, and normal weather changes (including wind) can cause temporary stress. Hibiscus need temperatures in the upper 60s to low 80s F. Exposure to extreme temperatures or drafts can cause the leaves to drop. If you re growing your hibiscus indoors, keep it away from heat and air vents and drafty windows. Light: Hibiscus are full-sun plants. Lack of sunlight can cause overall yellowing of the leaves. On the other hand, if the plant is getting sunburned, the leaves can get yellow or white splotches.


Insect Infestation: Spider mites and are two major pests of hibiscus that can cause leaf damage and discoloration. Look for spider mites on the underside of leaves, and aphids clustering near the tips. Nutrition Problems: Overfertilizing is another common cause of leaf yellowing in hibiscus, because of the shock it causes to the plant. Feed plants lightly and regularly, rather than heavily. I found some sources recommending occasionally supplementing your hibiscus with a very weak to lower the pH. I ve never tried this but it could be helpful if your water is alkaline. Extremely poor soil can also cause hibiscus leaf yellowing due to nutrient deficiency. If the leaves are turning yellow with green veins, a condition called chlorosis, it s a sign of nutrient (usually mineral) deficiency. Chemical Shock: Pesticides can also cause leaf yellowing in hibiscus, especially if applied too heavily or during the heat of the day. Use organic pest control products, such as, and follow package instructions exactly. Dormancy: Tropical hibiscus often goes through a dormancy stage during the winter. When you bring your plant indoors in the fall, it will likely lose some leaves due to the seasonal and environmental changes. Once you ve sleuthed out the cause of the problem, here are some tips for getting your plant back on track: Correct Problem: It probably goes without saying, but the first thing to do is change the conditions causing the problem! Water, repot, move, or protect your hibiscus plant to keep the growing conditions as stable as possible. Pruning: Once you ve corrected the problem, your hibiscus plant should begin to sprout new leaves, but you may want to trim back bare branches to reduce water and nutrient needs as your plant recovers. Be Patient: Plant problems can be difficult to diagnose and often take trial and error to correct. Once you hit upon the right solution, your hibiscus plant should recover nicely.

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