why does a butter knife have a notch

The here shown form of the blade is interpreted, to be a
cheese server ; thatБs in more or less all of the West European's cultures. But a nearly similar form of the blade is there also interpreted to be a fish knife. Another, less in dimensions, would be a fruit knife. Or much more little, itБs being used as a knife for sweets. Well, thatБs always a question of cultures, and of the dimensions too.


IБve seen a similar blade, with an additional hump, being the blade of an European cheese server Б well, that server was designed in a цб Neo-Renaissance цб style of the last quarter of the XIX century. My interpretation of the Б notch Б is: To be a visual sign of prevention, that the same knife wouldnБt be used for butter.


In common usage, a butter knife may refer to any non-serrated table knife designed with a dull edge and rounded point; formal patterns make a distinction between such a place knife (or table knife) and a butter knife. In this usage, a butter knife (or master butter knife ) is a sharp-pointed, dull-edged knife, often with a shape, used only to serve out pats of from a central to individual diners' plates.


Master butter knives are not used to spread the butter onto : this would contaminate the butter remaining in the butter dish when the next pat of butter was served. Rather, diners at the breakfast, the luncheon, and the informal dinner table use an individual butter knife to apply butter to their bread.


Individual butter knives have a round point, so as not to tear the bread, and are sometimes termed butter spreaders. If no butter spreaders are provided, a may be used as an alternative. Colloquially, are sometimes referred to as butter knives, though technically incorrect.

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