why would members of congress do casework

Members of Congress have a lot of burdens as our representatives. Legislative abilities include being able to write and propose new bills to the Clerk of the Ho
use of Representatives or the Senate (whichever their respective body is). Members of Congress can also be a member of committees which review legislature before bringing it to the whole of the House or Senate; when they're a member of the respective committee (there are many, many committees), they will review the bill. After they've read over it they can revise it with the group, decide (and vote) to propose the bill to the House or Senate, or decide to 'kill' the bill-- which means voting for it not to be proposed (basically saying that the bill would be a waste of time and resources). After going through the committee process- and every member of Congress is assigned to atleast one committee- the House and Senate members have the right to vote for, against, or abstain for any legislation being proposed.


A Congress member also has the right to speak for an alloted amount of time (given by the Speaker of the House, which is Boehner right now) to address concerns they may have about a bill that is being presented. They may also filibuster- which is a way of delaying a vote by talking incessantly. one Congress member was made famous for reading aloud a cookbook to delay a vote! Congress members also can campaign, meet with their constituents, and always need to be on call for any emergency meetings (usually these happen in times of fiscal/economical crises, natural disasters, or in times of war).


Members of Congress have a lot of burdens as our representatives. Legislative abilities include being able to write and propose new bills to the Clerk of the Ho use of Representatives or the Senate (whichever their respective body is). Members of Congress can also be a member of committees which review legislature before bringing it to the whole of the House or Senate; when they're a member of the respective committee (there are many, many committees), they will review the bill. After they've read over it they can revise it with the group, decide (and vote) to propose the bill to the House or Senate, or decide to 'kill' the bill-- which means voting for it not to be proposed (basically saying that the bill would be a waste of time and resources). After going through the committee process- and every member of Congress is assigned to atleast one committee- the House and Senate members have the right to vote for, against, or abstain for any legislation being proposed.


A Congress member also has the right to speak for an alloted amount of time (given by the Speaker of the House, which is Boehner right now) to address concerns they may have about a bill that is being presented. They may also filibuster- which is a way of delaying a vote by talking incessantly. one Congress member was made famous for reading aloud a cookbook to delay a vote! Congress members also can campaign, meet with their constituents, and always need to be on call for any emergency meetings (usually these happen in times of fiscal/economical crises, natural disasters, or in times of war).

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