why do we suffer according to buddha

The basis of Buddhism is a doctrine known as the Four Noble Truths. The First Truth is that all life is suffering, pain, and misery. The Second Truth is that this suffering is caused by selfish craving and personal desire. The Third Truth is that this selfish craving can be overcome. The Fourth Truth is that the way to overcome this misery is through the Eightfold Path. The Four Noble Truths is a fundamental concept taught by the Buddha. What are the Four Noble Truths? What does each mean? What is the Eightfold Path? This lesson will answer those questions. Note: This is an educational website. We are not promoting any one religion. Freedom from suffering is possible by practicing the Eightfold Path The Four Noble Truths are open to interpretation, especially in modern versions of Buddhism. 1. Suffering exists
The viewpoint is that life consists of suffering and dissatisfaction. This suffering is called d ukkha. Human nature is imperfect, as is the world you live in. During your lifetime, you inevitably have to endure physical suffering such as pain, sickness, injury, tiredness, old age, and eventually death. This is especially true for poor people. This means you are never able to keep permanently what you strive for. Happy moments pass by, and soon you will too. 2. Suffering arises from attachment to desires The cause of suffering is called samudaya or tanha.


It is the desire to have and control things, such as craving of sensual pleasures. For example, if you desire fame and fortune, you will surely suffer disappointment and perhaps even cause suffering for others. Attachment to material things creates suffering because attachments are transient and loss is inevitable. Thus suffering will necessarily follow. 3. Suffering ceases when attachment to desire ceases The end to suffering is called nirodha. It is achieving Nirvana, which is the final liberation of suffering. The mind experiences complete freedom, liberation and non-attachment. It lets go of any desire or craving. It is attaining dispassion. Nirvana means freedom from all worries, troubles and ideas. It is not comprehensible for those who have not attained it. 4. Freedom from suffering is possible by practicing the Eightfold Path In order to end suffering, you must follow the Eightfold Path. This liberation from suffering is what many people mean when they use the word enlightenment. The path to the end of suffering is gradually seeking self-improvement through the eight elements. The path to the end of suffering can extend over many lifetimes, throughout which every individual rebirth is subject to karmic conditioning. Craving, ignorance and other effects will disappear gradually, as progress is made through each lifetime.


There are eight attitudes or paths you must follow to find freedom from suffering. These are the right or correct things to do in your life: This is the way to reach Nirvana. ( See for more information. The Four Noble Truths is the basis of Buddhism. The First Truth is that all life is suffering, pain, and misery. The Second Truth is that this suffering is caused by selfish craving and personal desire. The Third Truth is that this selfish craving can be overcome. The Fourth Truth is that the way to overcome this misery is through the Eightfold Path. Do you have any questions, comments, or opinions on this subject? If so, with your feedback. I will try to get back to you as soon as possible. Click on a button to send an email, Facebook message, Tweet, or other message to share the link for this page: www. school-for-champions. com/religion/ buddhism_four_noble_truths. htm Please include it as a link on your website or as a reference in your report, document, or thesis. Where are you now? The final Noble Truth is the Buddha's prescription for the end of suffering. This is a set of principles called the Eightfold Path. The Eightfold Path is also called the Middle Way: it avoids both indulgence and severe asceticism, neither of which the Buddha had found helpful in his search for enlightenment.


The wheel of the Dharma, the symbol of the Eightfold Path The eight stages are not to be taken in order, but rather support and reinforce each other: Accepting Buddhist teachings. (The Buddha never intended his followers to believe his teachings blindly, but to practise them and judge for themselves whether they were true. ) A commitment to cultivate the right attitudes. Speaking truthfully, avoiding slander, gossip and abusive speech. Behaving peacefully and harmoniously; refraining from stealing, killing and overindulgence in sensual pleasure. Avoiding making a living in ways that cause harm, such as exploiting people or killing animals, or trading in intoxicants or weapons. Cultivating positive states of mind; freeing oneself from evil and unwholesome states and preventing them arising in future. Developing awareness of the body, sensations, feelings and states of mind. Developing the mental focus necessary for this awareness. The eight stages can be grouped into Wisdom (right understanding and intention), Ethical Conduct (right speech, action and livelihood) and Meditation (right effort, mindfulness and concentration). The Buddha described the Eightfold Path as a means to enlightenment, like a raft for crossing a river. Once one has reached the opposite shore, one no longer needs the raft and can leave it behind.

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