why do we have easter bunnies and eggs

Many of you may be enjoying eating Easter chocolate this weekend, but where does this tradition come from? Easter is a Christian festival that celebrates the resurrection of Jesus Christ. The Bible says that Christ died on the cross on a day called Good Friday, which this year falls on 30 March. Then he resurrected and came back to life on Easter Sunday. This is the most important day in the Christian calendar. Easter is on different dates each year, between 21 March and 25 April, depending on when there's a full moon in Spring. Many Christians will spend time at church in thought, prayer and celebration of Jesus Christ's life, and may get together with friends and family for a special meal. There are also some more modern traditions to mark Easter which are very common - such as Easter eggs, the Easter bunny and chocolate. But where do these modern traditions come from? Why do we have Easter eggs? A lot of us may chomp on chocolate eggs at Easter, but originally eating eggs was not allowed by church leaders during the week leading up to Easter (known as Holy Week). So any eggs laid that week were saved and decorated to make them Holy Week eggs, that were then given to children as gifts.


Victorians adapted the tradition with satin-covered cardboard eggs filled with Easter gifts. This has now developed into the tradition that many people enjoy today. Why are Easter eggs made of chocolate? The first chocolate eggs appeared in France and Germany in the 19th Century, but they were bitter and hard. As chocolate-making techniques improved, hollow eggs like the ones we have today were developed. They very quickly became popular and remain a favourite tradition with chocolate-lovers today. What's the Easter Bunny then? The story of the Easter Bunny is thought to have become common in the 19th Century. Rabbits usually give birth to a big litter of babies (called kittens), so they became a symbol of new life. Legend has it that the Easter bunny lays, decorates and hides eggs as they are also a symbol of new life. This is why some children might enjoy Easter egg hunts as part of the festival. It doesn't do all the work alone though! In Switzerland, Easter eggs are delivered by a cuckoo and in parts of Germany by a fox.
The hare was a popular motif in medieval church art.


In ancient times, it was widely believed (as by, and ) that the hare was a. The idea that a hare could reproduce without loss of led to an association with the, with hares sometimes occurring in and paintings of the Virgin and. It may also have been associated with the, as in the motif. Eggs, like rabbits and, are of. Since lay eggs and rabbits and hares give birth to large litters in the early spring, these became symbols of the rising fertility of the earth at the. Rabbits and hares are both prolific breeders. Female hares can conceive a second litter of offspring while still pregnant with the first. This phenomenon is known as. mature sexually at an early age and can give birth to several litters a year (hence the saying, "to breed like rabbits" or "to breed like bunnies"). It is therefore not surprising that rabbits and hares should become fertility symbols, or that their springtime mating antics should enter into Easter. In addition, Orthodox churches have a custom of abstaining from eggs during the fast of. The only way to keep them from being wasted was to boil or roast them, and begin eating them to break the fast. [ As a special dish, they would probably have been decorated as part of the celebrations.


Later, German retained the custom of eating colored eggs for Easter, though they did not continue the tradition of. Eggs boiled with some flowers change their color, bringing the spring into the homes, and some over time added the custom of. Many Christians of the to this day typically dye their red, the color of blood, in recognition of the blood of the sacrificed (and, of the renewal of life in springtime). Some also use the color green, in honor of the new foliage emerging after the long-dead time of winter. The art of decorating eggs for Easter, known as, dates to ancient, pre-Christian times. Similar variants of this form of artwork are seen amongst other eastern and central European cultures. The idea of an egg-giving hare went to the U. S. in the 18th century. Protestant German immigrants in the Oschter Haws ). Hase means "hare", not rabbit, and in Northwest European folklore the "Easter Bunny" indeed is a. According to the legend, only good children received gifts of colored eggs in the nests that they made in their caps and before Easter.

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