why do tomatoes get rotten on the bottom

Have you noticed tomato fruit that looks rotten on the bottom? A common problem in the garden, especially when, and a commonly asked about topic, blossom end rot is usually seen in half grown fruits or early on in the season. So what is tomato blossom end rot and what, if anything, can be done about it? Read on to learn more. Blossom end rot (BER) is a physiological condition that results in a brown or yellow water-soaked spot which appears on the end of the fruit where the blossom once was. As the tomato grows, this spot darkens, eventually becoming leathery and black, and may even cover half the fruit s bottom. Often blossom end rot in tomatoes is blamed on a lack of, either by depleted, poorly drained soil or simply from displacement due to transpiration, especially when plants are under stress. Technically, brown spots on tomatoes from blossom end rot is caused by this lack of calcium. For this reason, you often see it recommended that you should add calcium to the soil or replace the calcium in the plant through a foliar application in order to help correct the problem. But it is actually very rare for soil to be lacking in calcium. Instead, there can be a number of other environmental causes of tomato blossom end rot, from uneven watering due to drought, heavy rainfall or an over caring gardener.


Rapid plant growth, especially if given an overabundance of nitrogen early on, as well as fast climbing temperatures can contribute to blossom end rot in tomatoes and other susceptible fruits, like,
and. Blossom end rot occurs not because the soil lacks calcium but because the plant simply cannot take calcium out of the soil at a fast enough rate to keep up with the growth of the plant or because stress causes the plant to be unable to process the calcium the plant does take up. Unfortunately, this disorder cannot be fully cured, as you can t control nature. That said, tomato blossom end rot can be somewhat alleviated or managed to a certain extent by taking steps to improve or avoid conditions that foster its development at least those more easily controlled by the gardener, like poor soil, watering and fertilizing. and in a well-draining soil amended with organic matter will go a long way in giving the plants exactly what they need to develop healthy growth early on, which means that extra dose of fertilizer isn t necessary. And if you do, opt for one that is lower in nitrogen and only apply at the recommended rates, or cut by half.


Providing adequate and even amounts of is important too. The addition of can help retain moisture while keeping the soil and plant roots insulated. While it may or may not be effective, and is a highly debated topic, the addition of, limestone or calcium carbonate in the soil won t necessarily hurt, but it may not help much either. All in all, the majority of will at some point be affected with blossom end rot. But, in most cases, as the season progresses, this condition will normally clear up on its own without any major ill effects. As for the fruit suffering from tomato blossom end rot, these can simply be picked off and discarded or cut the bad parts out of larger, more ripened ones and eat the rest it won t harm you. What you have is most likely Blossom End Rot, but the cause is more complcated than simply irregular watering, although that could be one of the causes. Blossom End Rot is caused by a Calcium deficiency, most often at fruit set. That Ca deficiency could be the result of low soil CaCo3 levels (soil pH problems), lack of sufficient soil moisture so the plant cannot uptake needed nutrients (the irregular watering thing), a nutrient imbalance in the soil that causes a plant to uptake things it does not need instead of what it needs, a sudden growth spurt that gets the fruit started before the heavy calcium can reach that fruit, just not quite enough moisture available to the plant to move this heavy nutrient up the plant to the developing fruit.


Preventing BER next year starts now with a good, reliable soil test so you know what your soils pH is and what may need to be done to correct that, if necessary, as well as what nutrients may need help. Along with that good, reliable soil test there are these simple soil tests that can help you know your soil better, 1) Structure. From that soil sample put enough of the rest to make a 4 inch level in a clear 1 quart jar, with a tight fitting lid. Fill that jar with water and replace the lid, tightly. Shake the jar vigorously and then let it stand for 24 hours. Your soil will settle out according to soil particle size and weight. A good loam will have about 1-3/4 inch (about 45%) of sand on the bottom. about 1 inch (about 25%) of silt next, about 1 inch (25%) of clay above that, and about 1/4 inch (about 5%) of organic matter on the top. 2) Drainage.


Dig a hole 1 foot square and 1 foot deep and fill that with water. After that water drains away refill the hole with more water and time how long it takes that to drain away. Anything less than 2 hours and your soil drains too quickly and needs more organic matter to slow that drainage down. Anything over 6 hours and the soil drains too slowly and needs lots of organic matter to speed it up. 3) Tilth. Take a handful of your slightly damp soil and squeeze it tightly. When the pressure is released the soil should hold together in that clump, but when poked with a finger that clump should fall apart. 4) Smell. What does your soil smell like? A pleasant, rich earthy odor? Putrid, offensive, repugnant odor? The more organic matter in your soil the more active the soil bacteria will be and the nicer you soil will smell. 5) Life. How many earthworms per shovel full were there? 5 or more indicates a pretty healthy soil. Fewer than 5, according to the Natural Resources Conservation Service, indicates a soil that is not healthy. and know what you need to do to make that soil into the good, healthy soil needed to grow strong and healthy plants.

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