why is my spine sore to touch

Some types of cancer can metastasize (spread) to bones or the spine (vertebra), which can lead to fractures and deformities as well as severe pain. This process often happens as a late complication of the cancer. However, in certain conditions (such as multiple myeloma), painful vertebral (spine) and bone metastases may be seen earlier. The severe pain caused by vertebral and bone metastases is often difficult to treat. If youвre suffering from pain as a result of spreading tumors, your physician may prescribe one or more of the following treatments
Analgesics (e. g. , opioids [also called narcotics], NSAIDs [non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs], acetaminophen) Nevertheless, severe pain caused by cancer spreading to your bones may not be controlled with radiation and medications.


In these cases, your physician may consider more aggressive treatment to relieve your pain. The area over the affected bone may be sore or tender to the touch. The pain mainly appears when you move. Because pain medicines work on the pain centers of the brain regardless of what youвre doing in a particular moment, it is often difficult to find a dose of pain medicine that works equally well when youвre at rest and when youвre active. The spreading of the cancer causes inflammation, irritating the nerve endings in the bone and putting pressure on surrounding organs, tissues and bones. The types of cancer that are more likely to spread to the bones include multiple myeloma, prostate, breast and lung.


After asking you about your symptoms and doing a thorough clinical exam, your physician will order one or more imaging studies (e. g. , X-ray, CT, MRI, bone scan, PET), which will confirm the diagnosis. If left untreated, the cancer that has spread to your bone may result in the following conditions Pressure on the spinal cord, which can cause paralysis Itвs important to stay active to prevent the complications associated with immobility, such as infections and pressure sores. Ask questions about your pain control options and make a plan with your physician. A mix of medicine and non-medicine strategies often works best to control your pain.


Hi Tammy, sorry for the delay in getting back on this. --- As I recall, I came up with my own technique, which may or may not necessarily work well for others. Essentially, I lay on my RIGHT side first (on my bed), reach up with my LEFT arm as far as I can reach, and use my thumb to start massaging along the LEFT edge of my spine. I start as high as I can reach up, and then proceed downward, massaging each 1-2 vertebrae for a few seconds. --- (I notice individual vertebrae have varying pain/sensitivities at different times). Once I do that (takes maybe about 30 seconds total), I reach with my RIGHT arm and hand over the opposite LEFT shoulder, and reach down about to the point (still on the LEFT side of the spine) where I initially started massaging with my LEFT thumb.


I then start massaging up toward my neck with my RIGHT index and middle finger tips. Again, this takes maybe another 30 seconds. After I finish that side, I just reverse everything, which takes another minute or so. So, a total of approx. two minutes a day. One thing I notice virtually every time I do this is my sinuses clear up. My sinuses are mostly clear these days compared to what they used to be, but if I notice a little stuffiness, even sometimes in the middle of the night, I reflexively reach over and start massaging my spine, and the relief from the stuffiness helps me sleep a bit better. I hope this is a little clearer than mud!

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