why do they use the letter k for a strikeout

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The box score of a game is filled with all kinds of shorthand, which is necessitated by the desire for a concise encapsulation of the contest and by the constraints of print space, since box scores were found only in for the first century of their existence. As a result, baseball fans are familiar with the common abbreviations of the box score, such as E (error), HR (home run), DP (double play), and SB (stolen base). All of those have fairly obvious origins, but what about K, which stands for strikeout? The use of K has arguably transcended the box score to a greater degree than any other shorthand notation. The letter is often chanted by fans in a stadium when an opponent has two strikes, and placards with K on them are frequently displayed around a stadium to count how many strikeouts the home teamБs pitcher has tallied. However, most of these fans are likely not aware that the catchy abbreviation theyБre using owes its origin to a 19th-century Englishman who simply ran out of letters.


That man, Henry Chadwick, was a writer who had transferred his love of cricket to baseball when he saw the new game played in 1856. While working as a baseball reporter, Chadwick created many of the now-common features of baseball scoring and statistics keeping, including the numbers used to denote defensive positions (1 for pitcher, 2 for catcher, etc. ). He had already chosen S to stand for sacrifice in a box score, so he used K for a strikeout, since that is the last letter in Бstruck,Б which was at the time the most popular way to refer to a batterБs being out after three strikes. (A backwards K has come to indicate that a batter struck out without swinging at the third strike. ) ChadwickБs box score of an 1859 game has been recognized as the first box score ever (although there are a number of sources that dispute this claim), and his choices made in it have reverberated throughout baseball history.


His impact on how we describe the game was so great that Chadwick became the only journalist officially enshrined in the. A massive amount of people aspire to conduct their search for a new home on HGTV's House Hunters : The reality show gets 100 to 200 applications per week. Couples and families who appear on the show are rewarded with a chance to find their dream home, not to mention a shot at fame. But is there money in it for them, too? The answer is yesalthough the sum is probably much less than you think. Would-be homebuyers are paid a mere $500 to appear on House Hunters not even $500 each, but $500 per family. The per episode, on the other hand, is $45,000 to $50,000. Yup. The $500 stipend gets even more depressing when you think about how much time these couples have to put into the show: Each 23-minute episode takes about to film, spread out over three to five days.


Prospective homeowners spend six hours at each of the three houses. The rest of the time goes toward before-and-after interviews and footage capturing their daily life, from spending time with family to going to work. The Things broke the $500 payout down and found that a couple who films eight hours a day for five days makes a paltry $6. 25 an hour per person. And speaking of work: People usually have to take days off from their jobs to film, so they potentially lose money by being on the show. And we haven't even gotten to the time you spend applying before you even get cast. If your online application is selected to move forward in the process, next up is a phone interview, lots of paperwork, and shooting a 10-minute. That's a lot of work. At least your meals are paid for when you're in production.


One contestant that the director paid for her family's lunch every day and even took them out to dinner one night. Plus, they got access to those sweet, sweet craft services snacks. There is actually a contingent of onscreen personalities that get paid even less than the homebuyers: the realtors. But while they don't get that cold, hard cash, they get a ton of publicity. It's common for reality show contestant to be. Of course, if it's a competition show, there are big payouts for the winners. Big Brother pays a weekly stipend of about and then shells out a grand prize to the champion. American Ninja Warrior contestants don't get paid a penny if they. So, what have we learned? If you're looking to make a fortune, don't bank on a career in reality television. Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at.

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