why do we pledge allegiance to the american flag

Summary:б We need to return to basics in order to reform America. Devising complex technocratic solutions are a snare and dead end, building castles in the sky while the 1% gain strength. б We need to return to the fundamentals of the American project, both the symbolic and conceptual designs. Today we look at the Pledge, another in a series searching for a path to a better future for America. Oaths were not purpos d, more than law,
To keep the Good and Just in awe, But to confine the Bad and Sinful, Like mortal cattle in a penfold. Samuel Butler s Hudibras, Part II, Canto II (1664). I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States. In the fires of the Civil War a more detailed oath was forged, passed on 13 May 1884, now taken by all civil, military, and judicial officials excerpt the President. This is perfect: I do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter.


This oath points to our duty under the founding document. The Tea Party was exactly right that we have lost sight of our system as it was, and forgotten how it should work. Too bad they re interested in only fragments of the Constitution, and despise some of its principles (i. e. , they re part of the problem, not the solution). As the United States evolved in the Gilded Age, with rising inequality at home and imperial aspirations abroad, our rulers devised an oath suitable for peasants. б This was written by Francis Bellamy (socialist and Baptist minister) in 1892, formally adopted by Congress in 1942, and revised four times since then. The Founders are appalled by this. I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. This is wrong in many ways. The Constitution does not mention God, an explicit decision made for deep reasons. Swearing allegiance to the flag is antithetical to their ideas as expressed in the Oaths of office they created. That it is taken by children, too young to understand its meaning or seriousness, shows the intent to be indoctrination rather than devotion to citizenship.


This is the Pledge for a nation run by the 1%, a pledge to the Flag and pleasant abstract concepts. Their servants, today including people such as and, will tell you what those things mean. Swear allegiance to the flag and obey. This is a betrayal to Founder s legacy, and perhaps the moment when the American project first jumped off the rails. We need a new oath, appropriate for a two century old nation entering the 21st century. One taken by adults, perhaps at their coming of age to mark assumption of citizenship. Post your recommendations in the comments. Reforming America requires digging through the ruins of the US polity to find the foundation buried under the detritus. It remains sound, await our rediscovery of it, and we can rebuild on it. If you liked this post, and. б To see other posts about this go to What can you do? Click here to see. The Pledge of Allegiance was written in August 1892 by the socialist minister Francis Bellamy (1855-1931). It was originally published in The Youth's Companion on September 8, 1892. Bellamy had hoped that the pledge would be used by citizens in any country. "I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. " In 1923, the words, "the Flag of the United States of America" were added.


At this time it read: "I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. " In 1954, in response to the Communist threat of the times, President Eisenhower encouraged Congress to add the words "under God," creating the 31-word pledge we say today. Bellamy's daughter objected to this alteration. Today it reads: "I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. " The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag: "I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. ", should be rendered by standing at attention facing the flag with the right hand over the heart. When not in uniform men should remove any non-religious headdress with their right hand and hold it at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart. Persons in uniform should remain silent, face the flag, and render the military salute. " The original Bellamy salute, first described in 1892 by Francis Bellamy, who authored the original Pledge, began with a military salute, and after reciting the words "to the flag," the arm was extended toward the flag.


At a signal from the Principal the pupils, in ordered ranks, hands to the side, face the Flag. Another signal is given; every pupil gives the flag the military salute right hand lifted, palm downward, to a line with the forehead and close to it. Standing thus, all repeat together, slowly, "I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands; one Nation indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all. " At the words, "to my Flag," the right hand is extended gracefully, palm upward, toward the Flag, and remains in this gesture till the end of the affirmation; whereupon all hands immediately drop to the side. The Youth's Companion, 1892 Shortly thereafter, the pledge was begun with the right hand over the heart, and after reciting "to the Flag," the arm was extended toward the Flag, palm-down. In World War II, the salute too much resembled the Nazi salute, so it was changed to keep the right hand over the heart throughout. The Pledge of Allegiance

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