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why do u need a root canal

If you have been experiencing problems with a tooth, you may wonder, "Do I need a root canal? " Root canals, also known as endodontic therapy, are performed when the nerve or pulp of the tooth becomes infected and inflammed due to dental decay, a cracked or broken tooth or an injury to the tooth, according to the. During the procedure, a dentist uses a drill to remove both the nerve and pulp and seals up the tooth to protect against further damage. Only your dentist or a dental specialist called an endodontist, can determine whether a root canal will adequately treat your problem. Here are a few possible symptoms of the need for a root canal and some steps for dealing with them. The most common symptom that may indicate the need for a root canal is tooth pain, according to the. The intensity of the pain can range from mild to severe; it may lessen or intensify throughout the day, or it may get worse only when you bite down on the tooth. Some patients experience prolonged sensitivity to hot food or liquids. Your gums may also feel tender and swollen near the problem area. If you notice any of the above symptoms, contact your dentist right away.


Explain your symptoms by phone to a staff member, who may arrange for you to come in right away or may recommend emergency care depending on the severity of your symptoms. To soothe the pain and alleviate swelling, apply an ice pack to the outside of your jaw. Steps Your Dentist Will Take When you come in for your appointment, your dentist will examine your tooth and take X-rays in order to diagnose the cause of your problem. After proper examination, your dentist will be able to tell you the best course of action to resolve your symptoms or ask you to visit an endodontist, a specialist who treats nerve damage to the teeth. Depending on the cause of the problem, your dentist may recommend a root canal or a completely different and possibly less invasive dental procedure on what is diagnosed. Only your dentist can answer the question: "Do I need a root canal? " Call your dentist right away if you notice tooth pain, swelling or tenderness to get on the right track towards treatment.
Once the tooth is thoroughly cleaned, it is sealed.


Some dentists like to wait a week before sealing the tooth. For instance, if there is an infection, your dentist may put a inside the tooth to clear it up. Others may choose to seal the tooth the same day it is cleaned out. If the root canal is not completed on the same day, a temporary filling is placed in the exterior hole in the tooth to keep out contaminants like saliva and food between appointments. At the next appointment, to fill the interior of the tooth, a sealer paste and a rubber compound called gutta percha is placed into the tooth's root canal. To fill the exterior access hole created at the beginning of treatment, a filling is placed. The final step may involve further restoration of the tooth. Because a tooth that needs a root canal often is one that has a large filling or extensive decay or other, a, crown and post, or other often needs to be placed on the tooth to protect it, prevent it from breaking, and restore it to full function. Your dentist will discuss the need for any additional dental work with you. How Painful Is a Root Canal?


Root canal procedures have the reputation of being painful. Actually, most people report that the procedure itself is no more painful than having a filling placed. What Should One Expect After the Root Canal? For the first few days following the completion of a root canal, the tooth may feel sensitive due to natural tissue inflammation, especially if there was pain or infection before the procedure. This sensitivity or discomfort usually can be controlled with over-the-counter pain medications such as (, ) or ( ). Most patients can return to their normal activities the next day. Until your root canal procedure is completely finished -- that is to say, the permanent filling is in place and/or the crown, it's wise to minimize chewing on the tooth under repair. This step will help avoid recontamination of the interior of the tooth and also may prevent a fragile tooth from breaking before the tooth can be fully restored. As far as care is concerned, brush, floss, and use an antiseptic mouthwash as you regularly would and see your dentist at normally scheduled intervals.

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