why do we get diarrhea when nervous

Although there are a wide variety of health conditions that have diarrhea as a symptom, sometimes the cause of diarrhea can be attributed simply to stress or anxiety. If this happens to youthat is, you experience diarrhea symptoms when you are not sick, but instead are just stressed out it would be helpful to learn why this happens and what strategies you can use to avoid this unpleasant, and certainly unwanted, physical symptom. The reason that you can experience diarrhea when you are stressed is directly related to your body s programmed, what is commonly referred to as our fight-or-flight reaction. This reaction did a great job in helping us to survive as a species, particularly back when we were faced with things like hungry lions. But this same reaction has become more troublesome in light of the challenges you are faced with, and the fast pace of, modern life. When you come across something that you perceive as threatening, your body reacts with a variety of physical changes: heart rate and respiration increase, your muscles tense up, blood is directed toward your extremities, and most relevant to the current discussion, your colon contractions speed up. In some cases, this increase in colon activity can result in the symptom of diarrhea. People who have (IBS) can readily attest to the effect that stress has on their digestive system. However, it is possible to also experience stress-triggered diarrhea without having IBS. IBS is a syndrome that involves recurrent bouts of abdominal pain and significant and ongoing problems with diarrhea or constipation. A
is made according to specific criteria known as the. If your stress-related diarrhea happens quite frequently, you should make an appointment with your doctor for a proper diagnosis, as there are other health conditions that can cause you to experience diarrhea when under stress.


But, if your stress-related diarrhea only happens once in a while, it is unlikely that anything else is going on. You do not have to be a passive victim of anxiety-triggered diarrhea. There are a variety of stress management techniques that you can use to help your body to become more resilient in its response to outside stressors. TwoPactivities that have been associated with reducing your body s baseline anxiety levelPare yoga and meditation. PPracticing one or both of these on a regular basis will helpPyou to deal more effectively with the stressful situations in your life that arise. There are also some that you can use on the spot to help your body to turn off the stress response and thus hopefully quiet down your bowels, sparing you from further diarrhea episodes. These includePvisualization,P, andP. Like all skills, thesePrelaxation exercisesPare more effective when they are practiced on a regular basis. If you are under a lot of stress a lot of the time, it is also important to take an objective look at your life to see if changes can be made to reduce your overall stress level. Problem-solving and assertiveness skills can be utilized to make your life more comfortable. It may be helpful to initiate some psychotherapy to help you to better manage the stresses and challenges that are contributing to your stress-induced diarrhea. Even if you are fairly certain that stress is the culprit, you should discuss any unusual physical complaint with your doctor to ensure that no other disease process is present and contributing to the problem. Chang L. Gastroenterology. 2011;140(3). doi:10. 1053/j. gastro. 2011. 01. 032. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Phttps://www. niddk. nih. gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/diarrhea.


We've all been there: you've got a job interview, or a presentation to give at work, or a million and one things to do in the day and then it hits you. You've got the runs, or you're constipated, and your day just went to shit. Dealing with anxiety on any given day is tough, but add stress poo on top of that and you just want to give up. But, as a new report in Self. com notes, "Many people have that experience where stress causes irregularity of their bowels," Kyle Staller, M. D. , M. P. H. , a gastroenterologist at Massachusetts General Hospital, told the website. But just because it's common doesn't mean that you can't prevent it from happening on those days when you need everything to go right. According to Dr. Staller, the reason why you feel stress in your stomach is because "Your gastrointestinal tract has many nerves and is a nervous system organ much like the brain," he said. "The brain can impact what's going on in the gastrointestinal tract, and vice versa. " So when you're stressed out, it actually causes spasms in your gut, reports Self. "If the spasms are widespread, your whole colon is contracting, everything will move along quickly, and you'll experience diarrhea. However, if the spasms are only happening in one area, it can hold everything up and aggravate constipation. " If the spasms are widespread, your whole colon is contracting, everything will move along quickly, and you'll experience diarrhea. But although constipation is concerning (and truly sucks for those who know what it's like being stuck on the toilet trying to get anything to come out), diarrhea is actually far more common when you're stressed. If you're prone to getting diarrhea, reports Self and the same goes for constipation. "Stress will push you toward your usual default," Dr.


Staller said. Stress will push you toward your usual default. Eating greasy food, as well as drinking copious amounts of coffee and tea,. Certain foods, such as chocolate, can stimulate your gut, and if you're already tense, this can lead to messy poop. When you are feeling stressed and anxious, try to avoid eating and drinking stuff you know will make your stomach feel even worse. Instead, drink lots of water and eat healthy foods, such as vegetables. Doing this will ease unwanted pressure on your gut, and will make diarrhea and constipation less of a threat. Self also notes that you can to either curb diarrhea or to relax your bowels. However, if you suffer from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and stress makes it worse, they recommend low-dose anti-depressants, which can help treat your gut. However, always talk to your doctor about all available options before trying any medication. Meditation, yoga, and other stress-reducing techniques can also help relieve your gut when you're feeling particularly crummy. When you know you're going to have a stressful day, as a hectic morning can make you feel more anxious. "Wake up 15 minutes earlier than usual. Find a quiet place to sit and close your eyes. Tilt your head toward your heart and follow your breathing, feeling each breath open your heart and enliven your brain with oxygen," RD says. Tilt your head toward your heart and follow your breathing, feeling each breath open your heart and enliven your brain with oxygen. "Feel gratitude for another day with the people you love. Aim for a rewarding day. Tell yourself you'll be positive and peaceful, no matter what happens. " If you're already feeling anxious, by sitting on the ground, closing your eyes, and taking deep breaths. More from HuffPost Canada:

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