why do navy seals wear boonie hats

a regular soldier isnt allowed to wear a boonie cap out on missions due to the simple fact of how dangerous the missions are, in most military vehicles its. a regular soldier isnt allowed to wear a boonie cap out on missions due to the simple fact of how dangerous the missions are, in most military vehicles its required that you wear a kevlar just to get in the vehicle. the caps are good to wear though because they shade your head a lot more that a regular patrol cap does. now as for the SEALs and other elite forces like that, the reason that do it would probably have something to do with being able to move more quickly and it would also probably depend on the mission wether or not they would have to wear a kevlar or not
The boonie hat was introduced to the during the, when began wearing them in the field, along with and units.


These leopard spot or boonie hats were locally procured, and the camouflage cloth was usually salvaged from other uniform items, parachutes, or made up by a tailor. The name is derived from "boonie", the abbreviated form of (itself originally American derived from bundok, "mountain", during the ).


The hat was similar to the hat worn with the pattern 1941 uniform. In 1967, the U. S. Army began issuing boonie hats, as the "Hat, Jungle, with Insect Net", made of and wind-resistant, in, tigerstripe, and. It was meant to supplement and replace the and that had been in service since. As the U. S. military evolved away from a mentality, the boonie hat found a permanent place as part of the uniform of all services. The boonie hat has changed little through the decades since the Vietnam War and was used in the and still in the as an alternative to the.


The U. S. military boonie hat has come in a variety of camouflage patterns; the current assortment includes, and both desert and woodland versions of, as well as the Air Force pattern. The boonie hat is often worn with the wearer's rank insignia pinned or sewn to the front, above the branch loops. Hat, Camouflage (Tropical Combat) Type II In 1968 the U. S. Army authorized use of the woodland ERDL pattern ( ) material, used in the 1969 and later production of hats in cotton material.


These were labeled, "Hat, Camouflage (Tropical Combat) Type II" with contract dates starting in 1968. They were in use from 1968 for both the Army and Air Force, and from 1969-70 for the Marine Corps and Navy. Hat, Sun, Hot Weather Later boonies are called "Hat, Sun" or "Hat, Sun, Hot Weather", which is still the designation for this type of cover. They are made in various patterns, in cotton ripstop or nylon blend cloth.

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