why do some people have all the luck

Why do some people have all the luck while others are perpetually unlucky? Professor Richard Wiseman of the University of Hertfordshire was determined to get to the scientific bottom of the phenomenon of luck, and what he discovered may surprise you:
I placed advertisements in national newspapers asking for people who felt consistently lucky or unlucky to contact me. Hundreds of extraordinary men and women volunteered for my research and over the years, have been interviewed by me. I have monitored their lives and had them take part in experiments. The results reveal that although these people have almost no insight into the causes of their luck, their thoughts and behaviour are responsible for much of their good and bad fortune. Take the case of seemingly chance opportunities. Lucky people consistently encounter such opportunities, whereas unlucky people do not. I carried out a simple experiment to discover whether this was due to differences in their ability to spot such opportunities. I gave both lucky and unlucky people a newspaper, and asked them to look through it and tell me how many photographs were inside. I had secretly placed a large message halfway through the newspaper saying: 'Tell the experimenter you have seen this and win $50'.


This message took up half of the page and was written in type that was more than two inches high. It was staring everyone straight in the face, but the unlucky people tended to miss it and the lucky people tended to spot it. Unlucky people are generally more tense than lucky people, and this anxiety disrupts their ability to notice the unexpected. http://timesofindia. indiatimes. com/articleshow/3896391. cms Most of us probably are familiar with Job, the Biblical character whose faith was deliberately tested with misfortunes. First, marauders stole his oxen and donkeys, and killed his servants. Then, a wind swept in and collapsed his house, killing his sons and daughters. If that wasn't enough, he then was afflicted with painful sores from the soles of his feet to the crown of his head. Things got so bad for Job that at one point, he even cursed the day of his birth. "Sighing has become my daily food," he wailed. "My groans pour out like water. " Job had it pretty rough, but he hasn't been the only one. Plenty of others throughout history have been plagued by successive calamities. There's Violet Jessop, who worked as a stewardess on the maiden voyage of the Titanic in 1912, and managed to survive the giant liner's collision in the North Atlantic with an iceberg -- only to take a job as a nurse on the Britannic, which sank in 1916 in the Aegean Sea.


And more recently, there's the bizarre story of English tourists Jason and Jenny Cairns-Lawrence, who were visiting New York City when Al Qaeda hijackers crashed two planes into the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, and happened to be in London when the city's public transportation system was attacked by terrorists in July 2005, and traveled to Mumbai, India in November 2008, just in time to witness a third terrorist attack. Newspaper writers took to calling them "the world's unluckiest couple. " The idea that some people are destined to suffer chronic misfortune is so ingrained in our consciousness that there even have been songs written about it -- for example, "Born Under a Bad Sign," the blues classic recorded by Albert King back in 1967, in which the narrator complains that "if it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all. " But is there really such a thing as chronic bad luck, and if so, why do some people seem to be plagued by it? Psychologists and academic experts in probability and statistics, who've studied the phenomenon of bad luck, provide a complicated answer.


It is true that in the course of a lifetime, some people have a lot more bad things happen to them than most of us do. But that outcome can be influenced by a variety of factors, including random chance, the actions of other people, and individuals' own decision-making skills and competence at performing tasks. But in our minds, it all blends together and forms this thing that we think of as bad luck. Rami Zwick, a business professor at the University of California-Riverside, points out that the idea of bad luck exists, in part, because most of us don't have a very good understanding of how the science of probability works. "There is a difference between individual and aggregate experiences of people in a population," he explains. If you ask 100 people to flip a coin 100 times, for example, over time, you can expect that the average result for the group will be 50 heads and 50 tails. But within the group, individuals may have more heads than tails, or vice-versa. "If we think of heads as good and tails as bad, a few people will have a sequence of mostly good outcomes, and others will have mostly bad ones. "

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